• zoomCorps(e)
    Corps(e) © Alvarez Luis
  • zoomCorps(e)
    Corps(e) © Alvarez Luis
  • zoomCorps(e)
    Corps(e) © Alvarez Luis
  • zoomCorps(e)
    Corps(e) © Alvarez Luis
  • zoomCorps(e)
    Corps(e) © Alvarez Luis

Corps(e)

Synopsis

A three-part study of the suffering and exultant body for seven dancers, including a circus performer, based on the paintings of Robert Mapplethorpe, Caravaggio, and Francis Bacon. The first part takes a classical look at the body in a sequence that gives priority to working on the individual and difference. This is achieved by the coexistence of dynamically different solos and duets that are treated head-on, by a series of stills and flashes. Next comes the body seen from a Baroque perspective, moving in a group, marked by theatrical expression and dramatised by light. Last comes the body, still the same body, exposed in a contemporary manner, seen through its tensions, disorientation, ruptures, and frenzied energy.

Press

Press

"Corps(e)' is a triptych about the delighted and suffering body, considered consecutively from a classical, a baroque and a contemporary point of view, based on the works of Robert Mapplethorpe, Caravaggio and Francis Bacon. It studies the limits that we impose on the body and what the body imposes upon us; from orgy to self-mutilation, from erotism to torture, from body-building to decomposition. This performance for six dancers and an acrobat consists of three pieces separated by an interlude showing volatile similarities rooted in certain returning elements in the works of the three artists who have inspired the choreographer. A very obvious common pattern appears around the religious figures of Caravaggio and Bacon, the clear-obscurness of Caravaggio and Mapplethorpe and the morbidity and eroticism that characterizes the work of all three. Apart from the similarities, a different formal argumentation is developed in each of the three parts. In the first part, "X, Y, Z", inspired by the photographs of Mapplethorpe, the emphasis lies on the notion of perfection and on the tension between classicism and humanity. The second part, "Il Ladro di Carne", based on the paintings of Caravaggio, treats the deification of reality and the relation between naturalism and theatricality. The last part, "Matter of fact", based on selected works of Francis Bacon, is a study of the animality of flesh and the battle between the figure and its surroundings. Throughout these different aesthetic approaches, we find comparable questions about the body: the limits we determine for our experience of pleasure (gluttony or the sexual exploration of pain) or our perfection (plastic surgery, organ transplantation, body-building) and the restraints the body imposes on itself by illness, aging, and death. These questions are left without concrete answers. Thierry Smits continues to develop the research from previous works. He attempts to unite the art of composition of "Soirée dansante" with the study of physicality from "Cyberchrist" The performance is left to the same set of creatures 'fusing simultaneously casualness and irritation towards the codes of contemporary dance'

Libération, M.C. Vernay

Tour

Tour

Première 13/01/1998=>17/01/1998 Théâtre Varia Bruxelles
24/01/1998 De Velinx Tongeren
30/01/1998 CC Achterolmen Maaseik
04/02/1998 CC Berchem Berchem
07/02/1998 CC de Adelberg Lommel
12/02/1998 CC Westrand Dilbeek
28/02/1998 CC Strombeek Bever Strombeek Bever
20/03/1998 CC de Zwaneberg Heist-Op-Den-Berg
09/04/1998 Stadschouwburg Brugge Brugge
17,18/04/1998 Lantaren/Venster Rotterdam (NL)
27,28/05/1998 CC Les Chiroux Liège
05,06/06/1998 International Dance Week Festival Zagreb (CR)
11/12/1998 De Werf Aalst
05/01/1999 Schouwburg Tilburg (NL)
15/01/1999 CC Hasselt Hasselt
10/02/1999=>20/02/1999 Théâtre Varia Bruxelles
26,27/02/1999 Trafo Budapest (HU)
18,19/03/1999 Théâtre de Namur Namur

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